Friday, March 14, 2014

Great Exposure Lesson

I just stumbled upon the greatest little exposure lesson. When I first got my 'big girl camera', I thought making sense of the aperture, shutter speed and ISO working together was one of the hardest concepts to understand.  Now that I 'get it', it just takes practice to actually do it.

After reading this lesson, I thought they got the point across in an excellent way for beginners like myself. So I just had to share. 

I'm just going to give you the meat and taters of it, you can read the full article at Digital Photography School in Tips and Tutorials.  Be sure to click on that link to view the images they used as well.

 APERTURE = how WIDE you open your eyes

A small aperture (a large f-stop or f-number, like f/22) is like squinting. A large aperture (a small f-stop or f-number, like f/1.4) is like having “bug eyes”.

Quiz:  If you are shooting in low light, how wide do you open your eyes? Will you see well at night if you are squinting (small aperture)?
Quiz:  What happens on a super bright day if your eyes are wide open and they’re open for a long time (slow shutter and large aperture)? Can you see well then?


SHUTTER SPEED = how LONG you open your eyes

A fast shutter, like 1/1000th of a second, is blinking super fast. A slow shutter speed, like 2 seconds, is keeping your eyes open and then blinking. The thing to remember is:  your brain is recording everything when your eyes are open. So if you or something you’re looking at is moving, and your eyes are open a long time (slow shutter), then your brain will record a blurry image.

Quiz:  If you want a crisp shot of someone jumping, how long do you need your eyes open? What will freeze the shot:  a quick blink (fast shutter) or a slow one (slow shutter)?


ISO = special glasses that help you see in the dark

ISO is like the opposite of sunglasses. Let’s call them MOONglasses!  
The higher the ISO, the thicker your moonglasses, so the more you are able to see in low light. You need thick moonglasses (high ISO) when shooting indoors or at dusk. You need very thin moonglasses (low ISO) when it’s a sunny day.

Quiz:  do I need thick, thin or medium moonglasses if I’m shooting at the beach on my lunch break?


All 3 of these things work together

Here is an example:  You are photographing your sleeping cat who is snuggled on the couch. There is not much light coming through the windows or additional ambient light. To see well, you have medium-to-thick moonglasses on (such as ISO 600). You need to have your eyes open pretty wide (large aperture, such as f/1.4). However, you don’t have great vision (you have a kit lens that only goes up to f/4.5), so you need more light to see. Thus, you leave your eyes open longer (slow shutter speed, such as 1/30th sec).

 

Final Quiz:

  1. In the same scenario, your cat notices you are snapping photos, so she starts walking away and leaps off the couch. You still want to photograph her. Which would you change:  how open your eyes are (aperture), how long you leave your eyes open (shutter speed), or thickness of your moonglasses (ISO)?
  2. If you increase your shutter speed because you want to freeze the image, what else would you need to change? (If you changed nothing else, the image would be too dark because you let in less light.)
Once you get the basic concept of exposure and how the three components of the exposure triangle (aperture, shutter speed and ISO) work together, turn your DSLR camera to “manual” and practice the specific settings based on different circumstances.

Full credit for this article goes to Digital Photography School.

So what did you think? I loved it for newbies!

 

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